Vintage

Replacing a Coat Lining

An inexpensive trenchcoat of waterproof khaki ...

An inexpensive trenchcoat of waterproof khaki with a snap-out lining by VEB Leipziger Bekleidungswerks. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’ve been meaning to write about replacing a coat lining for months–I’m either very late, or very early!

J has a now-vintage winter coat from Structure (the former men’s line from Compagnie Internationale Express) that has held up to much abuse over the years. The lining finally gave out though (and was hanging from the hem in tatters not unlike a tail!), but J didn’t want to give up on it.

You’ll find many vintage coats at thrift stores and estate sales have this same issue–the lining tends to be the least durable part of the coat’s construction. Thankfully, though, replacing a lining is something you can do fairly easily and inexpensively.

Supplies needed:

  • Fabric: For this project, I bought some nice cling-free poly lining from the late Hancock Fabrics. I bought 3 yards just to have some left over. You can use many different fabrics for linings–silk, polyester, even quilting cottons! It can be so fun to add a funky patterned lining to a classic trench or peacoat. The sky is the limit!
  • Thread: Go for good quality, since coats take strain at the seams.
  • Needles: With thick fabrics like wool, make sure you have the appropriate size needles for your machine–they can get dull quickly. There will also be some hand-sewing to finish, so make sure you have a needle for that too!

The black fabrics didn’t photograph terribly well, and I always forget to take in-progress photos, so I can just briefly explain the process:

  1. Take a seam ripper and carefully remove HALF of the lining. Go ahead and cut it away from the half you are leaving intact.
  2. The half you cut out will become your pattern for the new lining. Just cut on the fold for the main interior piece, cut two sleeves, etc., until you have all the pieces.
  3. The half of the fabric you left in will show you how to re-construct the garment. Assemble the sleeve, and then start sewing the lining into the coat. Work around until you hit the sections of the old lining that you left in, and begin to remove them and sew in the new lining.
  4. Finish off the bottom corners by hand.

 

 

 

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Free and affordable resources for sewing formal gowns, bridesmaid and prom dresses

Sew Your Own Formal Gown | Jungleland Vintage

Bridal gowns, prom and bridesmaid dresses, evening wear– formal clothing can be some of the most expensive items your closet. It can also be hard to find a good fit or a true expression of one’s personal style. Sewing your own dress can be a way to save money, tailor the garment to your own shape, and create something truly unique… you just need to have a lot of patience with slippery fabrics and fiddly pattern pieces! Making a muslin or toile first out of old fabric (even an old sheet!) can help you to work out fit before you cut into pretty fabric. To get started, you can download a modern pattern–many are free–or find a lovely vintage pattern, and even shop for fabric and notions online as well. Ain’t the Internet grand?

FREE PATTERNS

Lekala Wedding Dress | Free download found via JunglelandVintage.com

Lekala Wedding Dress | Free download

Sharon Sews | Golden goddess gown | tutorial / no pattern needed!

Sharon Sews | Golden goddess gown | tutorial / no pattern needed!

PATTERNS $10 OR LESS

Ahem… we’ve got many nice dress patterns in our shop…

Simplicity 3735 Evening or prom dress Misses Evening Gown - Sew Stylish Collection sewing pattern new uncut size 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Simplicity 3735 Sew Stylish Collection | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

| Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

McCall’s 5001 Evening Elegance | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Tracy Reese dress sewing pattern Vogue 1379 | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Tracy Reese dress sewing pattern Vogue 1379 | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Simplicity 5498 Sundress | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Simplicity 5498 Sundress | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Simplicity 4401 Formal separates | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

Simplicity 4401 Formal separates | Jungleland Vintage on Etsy

 

FABRIC

Fabric Mart is our all-time favorite online fabric store. So many great sales!

Gorgeous Fabrics has many beautiful, one-of-a-kind fabrics.

 

NOTIONS

Fabric.com has everything you need to get started in one handy package:  Big EverSewn Sewing Starter Kit.

WAWAK is the best! Fast, reasonable shipping and lots of sales.

 

OTHER RESOURCES

So Vintage Patterns— Most of their patterns are pretty pricey, but they have an amazing selection of vintage patterns.

 

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Inspiration: Jose Romussi embroidered vintage photographs

I absolutely love what Jose Romussi does to vintage photographs of dancers… string art and embroidery taken to a whole new level.

Jose Romussi embroidered photograph of Anna Pavlova

Jose Romussi embroidered photograph of Anna Pavlova

Jose Romussi Dance-7.1-Alla-Schellest

Jose Romussi Dance-7.1-Alla-Schellest

 

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Inspiration: Stephen Shore

 

Stephen Shore Room 11, Star Motel, Manistique, Michigan, July 8, 1973

I probably shouldn’t admit that I first learned about Stephen Shore on Pinterest. I became kind of obsessed with the picture above. I feel like I’ve been in this motel room before, and yet I wish I could buy every object in this room.

Stephen Shore (b. 1947) is a NYC-born, self-taught photographer who sold his first photographs to MOMA at age 14, started hanging out at Andy Warhol’s Factory at 17, and had a solo show at the Met at 24. His color photographs from cross-country road trips in the 1970s, such as the one above, cemented his place among the most critically-acclaimed American photographers, but he has done a variety of interesting projects since then. He even has an Instagram account.

Stephen Shore, Sugar Bowl Restaurant (7 July, 1973), Gaylord, Michigan, USA

Stephen Shore, Sugar Bowl Restaurant (7 July, 1973), Gaylord, Michigan, USA

 

 

In the Shop: Sewing Patterns

Vintage Sewing Pattern Roundup–Etsy Sale Edition

Growing up with a mom who sewed, I developed a love for patterns early in life. Sitting at that little table in the fabric store, flipping through the big books from Vogue and McCall’s, imagining the possibilities, I waited for the sales to scoop up my favorites. I loved cutting out each piece of a pattern, even if my project didn’t call for it.

Eventually, my mom’s health made her give up sewing, and I inherited the whole collection of patterns at her house. Later on, when I discovered that some thrift stores sold patterns, my stash grew larger. And then one day I discovered digital downloads…

Long story long, I have a LOT of patterns. It’s hard to let go of them, but I know realistically, I’ll never make them all. So I put a few at a time in our Etsy shop, all at very reasonable prices, if I do say so myself. Want to see?